d'Averanches, Ruallon Sheriff of Kent

Male 1070 - 1147  (77 years)


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  • Name d'Averanches, Ruallon 
    Suffix Sheriff of Kent 
    Born 1070 
    Gender Male 
    Died 1147 
    Notes 
    • From the Battle Abbey Roll



      This house can be distinctly traced back to the father of the first Duke of Normandy, Rognavald, Earl of More. Besides his two legitimate sons, he had, by a favourite slave whom he espoused more danico, a third, named Hrollager, who settled with them in Neustria. Hrollager's three grandsons each became the founder of an illustrious Norman stock. From the eldest, Anslac de Bastembourg, came the Bertrams, Sires de Briquebec, and the younger house of Montfort-sur-Rille; from the second William, the barons of Bec-Crespin; and from the third, Ansfrid the Dane who was Viscount of Exmes, or Hiesmes, before 978, the house of Avranches. He was the first Viscount of Hiesmes that is on record, and his descendants inherited this dignity, as well as his surname of Le Gotz or Gois. Toustain Le Gois, his grandson, was Chamberlain to Duke Robert the Magnificent, Stood high in his favour, and went with him to the Holy Land; but having rebelled against his successor, forfeited the whole of his possessions, which were granted to the new Duke's mother, Arletta. Toustain's son Richard, however, who had never swerved from his allegiance, obtained his pardon, and set matters straight by a judicious alliance. He married Emma, or Emmeline, de Conteville, Arletta's daughter, who brought him back all the lands that his father had lost; and acquired numerous other estates, notably in the Avranchin, from whence he took his name. In Duke William's charter to the Abbey of St. Evroult (about 1064), he signs himself Richard d'Avranches, being at that time Seigneur or Viscount of the Avranchin. Wace mentions him at the battle of Hastings:




      Son of William fitz Wimund d'Avranches and Matilda filia Baldwin.

      See DP, 490. CP IV Heirs of Richard FitzBaldwin Pedigree. CP IV:
      317-318. Louis Sorley, The Sorley Pedigrees, pps 39-50. DD, pps 263,
      436.


      Acceded 1130

      Son of William by Maud. Hasteds History of Kent Vol 3 page 370

      This name Ruallon who married Maud de Muneville, heiress of Folkestone, being most capriciously spelt, not only Roellandus, Ruellinus, Roelent, Rualo, and Ruallon, but also Graalandus and Graelent, - Planche

      It plainly appears that this entry in Domesday does not only relate to the lands within this parish, but to those in the adjoining parishes within the hundred, the whole of which, most probably, were held of the bishop of Baieux, but to which of them each part refers in particular, is at this time impossible to point out. About four years after the taking of the above survey, the bishop was disgraced, and all his possessions consiscated to the crown. After which, Nigell de Muneville, a descendant of William de Arcis, mentioned before in Domesday, appears to have become possessed of the lordship of Folkestone, and as such in 1095, being the 9th year of king William Rufus, removed the priory of Folkestone from the bail of the castle to the place where it afterwards continued. His son William dying in his life-time s. p, Matilda his sole daughter and heir was given in marriage with the whole of her inheritance, by king Henry I. to Ruallanus de Albrincis, or Averenches, whose descendant Sir William de Albrincis, was become possessed of this lordship at the latter end of that reign; and in the 3d year of the next reign of king Stephen, he confirmed the gifts of his ancestors above-mentioned to the priory here. He appears to have been one of those knights, who had each a portion of lands, which they held for the de sence of Dover castle, being bound by the tenure of those lands to provide a certain number of soldiers, who should continually perform watch and ward within it, according to their particular allotment of time; but such portions of these lands as were not actually in their own possession were granted out by them to others, to hold by knight's service, and they were to be ready for the like service at command, upon any necessity whatever, and they were bound likewife, each knight to desend a certain tower in the castle; that desended by Sir William de Albrincis being called from him, Averenches tower, and afterwards Clinton tower, from the future owners of those lands. (fn. 2) Among those lands held by Sir William de Albrincis for this purpose was Folkestone, and he held them of the king in capitle by barony. These lands together made up the barony of Averenches, or Folkestone, as it was afterwards called, from this place being made the chief of the barony, caput baroniæ, as it was stiled in Latin; thus The Manor of Folkestone, frequently called in after times An Honor, (fn. 3) and the mansion of it the castle, from its becoming the chief seat or residence of the lords paramount of this barony, continued to be so held by his descendants, whose names were in Latin records frequently speit Albrincis, but in French Avereng and Averenches, and in after times in English ones, Evering; in them it continued till Matilda, daughter and heir of William de Albrincis, carried it in marriage to Hamo de Crevequer, who, in the 20th year of that reign, had possession given him of her inheritance. He died in the 47th year of that reign, possessed of the manor of Folkestone, held in capite, and by rent for the liberty of the hundred, and ward of Dover castle. Robert his grandson, dying s. p. his four sisters became his heirs, and upon the division of their inheritance, and partition of this barony, John de Sandwich, in right of his wife Agnes, the eldest sister, became entitled to this manor and lordship of Folkestone, being the chief seat of the barony, a preference given to her by law, by reason of her eldership; and from this he has been by some called Baron of Folkestone, as has his son Sir John de Sandwich, who left an only daughter and heir Julian, who carried this manor in marriage to Sir John de Segrave, who bore for his arms, Sable, three garbs, argent. He died in the 17th year of Edward III. who, as well as his son, of the same name, received summons to parliament, though whether as barons of Folkestone, as they are both by some called, I know not. Sir John de Segrave, the son, died possessed of this manor anno 23 Edward III. soon after which it appears to have passed into the family of Clinton, for William de Clinton, earl of Huntingdon, who bore for his arms, Argent, crusulee, situchee, sable, upon a chief, azure, two mullets, or, pierced gules; which coat differed from that of his elder brother's only in the croslets, which were not borne by any other of this family till long afterwards, (fn. 4) died possessed of it in the 28th year of that reign, at which time the mansion of this manor bore the name of the castle. He died s. p. leaving his nephew Sir John de Clinton, son of John de Clinton, of Maxtoke, in Warwickshire, his heir, who was afterwards summoned to parliament anno 42 Edward III. and was a man of great bravery and wisdom, and much employed in state affairs. He died possessed of this manor, with the view of frank-pledge, a moiety of the hundred of Folkestone, and THE MANOR OF WALTON, which, though now first mentioned, appears to have had the same owners as the manor of Folkestone, from the earliest account of it. He married Idonea, eldest daughter of Jeffry, lord Say, and at length the eldest coheir of that family, and was succeeded in these manors by his grandson William, lord Clinton, who, anno 6 Henry IV. had possession granted of his share of the lands of William de Say, as coheir to him in right of his grandmother Idonea, upon which he bore the title of lord Clinton and Saye, which latter however he afterwards relinquished, though he still bore for his arms, Qnarterly, Clinton and Saye, with two greybounds for his supporters. After which the manor of Folkestone, otherwise called Folkestone Clinton, and Walton, continued to be held in capite by knight's service, by his descendants lords Clinton, till Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, which title he then bore, together with Elizabeth his wife, in the 30th year of Henry VIII. conveyed these manors, with other premises in this parish, to Thomas Cromwell lord Cromwell, afterwards created earl of Essex, on whose attainder two years afterwards they reverted again to the crown, at which time the lordship of Folkestone was stiled an honor; whence they were granted in the fourth year of Edward VI. to the former possessor of them, Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold in capite, for the meritorious services he had performed. In which year, then bearing the title of lord Clinton and Saye, he was declared lord high admiral, and of the privy council, besides other favours conferred on him; and among other lands, he had a grant of these manors, as abovementioned, which he next year, anno 5 Edward VI. reconveyed back to the crown, in exchange for other premises. (fn. 5) He was afterwards installed knight of the garter, by the title of Earl of Lincoln and Baron of Clinton and Saye; and in the last year of that reign, constable of the tower of London. Though in the 1st year of queen Mary he lost all his great offices for a small time, yet he had in recompence of his integrity and former services, a grant from her that year, of several manors and estates in this parish, as well as elsewhere, and among others, of these manors of Folkestone and Walton, together with the castle and park of Folkestone, to hold in capite; all which he, the next year, passed away by sale to Mr. Henry Herdson, citizen and alderman of London, who lest several sons, of whom Thomas succeeded him in this estate, in whose time the antient park of Folkestone seems to have been disparked. His son Mr. Francis Herdson alienated his interst in these manors and premises to his uncle Mr. John Herdson, who resided at the manor of Tyrlingham, in this parish, and dying in 1622, was buried in the chancel of Hawking church, where his monument remains; and there is another sumptuous one besides erected for him in the south isle of Folkestone church. They bore for their arms, Argent, a cross sable, between four fleurs de lis, gules. He died s. p. and by will devised these manors, with his other estates in this parish and neighbourhood, to his nephew Basill, second son of his sister Abigail, by Charles Dixwell, esq. Basill Dixwell, esq. afterwards resided at Tyrlingham, a part of the estate devised to him by his uncle, where, in the 3d year of king Charles I. he kept his shrievalty, with great honor and hospitality; after which he was knighted, and in 1627, anno 3 Charles I. created a baronet; but having rebuilt the mansion of Brome, in Barham, he removed thither before his death. On his decease unmarried, the title of baronet became extinct; but he devised these manors, with the rest of his estates, to his nephew Mark Dixwell, son of his elder brother William Dixwell, of Coton, in Warwickshire, who afterwards resided at Brome. He married Elizabeth, sister and heir of William Read, esq. of Folkestone, by whom he had Basill Dixwell, esq. of Brome, who in 1660, anno 12 Charles II. was created a baronet. His son Sir Basill Dixwell, bart. of Brome, about the year 1697, alientated these manors, with the park-house and grounds, and other estates in this parish and neighbourhood, to Jacob Desbouverie, esq. of LondonHe was descended from Laurence de Bouverie, de la Bouverie, or Des Bouveries, of an antient and honorable extraction in Flanders, (fn. 6) who renouncing the tenets of the Romish religion came into England in the year 1567, anno 10 Elizabeth, and seems to have settled first at Canterbury. He was a younger son of Le Sieur des Bouveries, of the chateau de Bouverie, near Lisle, in Flanders, where the eldest branch of this family did not long since possess a considerable estate, bearing for their arms, Gules, a bend, vaire. Edward, his eldest son, was an eminet Turkey merchant, was knighted by king James II. and died at his seat at Cheshunt, in Hertfordshire, in 1694. He had seven sons and four daughters; of the former, William, the eldest, was likewife an eminent Turkey merchant, and was, anno 12 queen Anne, created a baronet, and died in 1717. Jacob, the third son, was purchaser of these manors; and Christopher, the seventh son, was knighted, and seated at Chart Sutton, in this county, under which a further account of him may be seen; (fn. 7) and Anne, the second daughter, married Sir Philip Boteler, bart. Jacob Desbouverie afterwards resided at Tyrlingham, and dying unmarried in 1722, by his will devised these manors, with his other estates here, to his nephew Sir Edward Desbouverie, bart. the eldest brother son of Sir William Desbouverie, bart. his elder brother, who died possessed of them in 1736, s. p. on which his title, with these and all his other estates, came to his next surviving brother and heir Sir Jacob Desbouverie, bart. who anno 10 George II. procured an act to enable himself and his descendants to use the name of Bouverie only, and was by patent, on June 29, 1747, created baron of Longford, in Wiltshire, and viscount Folkestone, of Folkestone. He was twice married; first to Mary, daughter and sole heir of Bartholomew Clarke, esq. of Hardingstone, in Northamptonshire, by whom he had several sons and daughters, of whom William, the eldest son, succeeded him in titles and estates; Edward is now of Delapre abbey, near Northamptonshire; Anne married George, a younger son of the lord chancellor Talbot; Charlotte; Mary married Anthony, earl of Shastesbury; and Harriot married Sir James Tilney Long, bart. of Wiltshire. By Elizabeth his second wife, daughter of Robert, lord Romney, he had Philip, who has taken the name of Pusey, and possesses, as heir to his mother Elizabeth, dowager viscountess Folkestone, who died in 1782, several manors and estates in the western part of this county. He died in 1761, and was buried in the family vault at Britford, near Salisbury, being succeeded in title and estates by his eldest son by his first wife, William, viscount Folkestone, who was on Sept. 28, anno 5 king George III. created Earl of Radnor, and Baron Pleydell Bouverie, of Coleshill, in Berkshire. He died in 1776, having been three times married; first, to Harriot, only daughter and heir of Sir Mark Stuart Pleydell, bart. of Colefhill, in Berkshire. By her, who died in 1750, and was buried at Britford, though there is an elegant monument erected for her at Coleshill, he had Hacob, his successor in titles and estates, born in 1750. He married secondly, Rebecca, daughter of John Alleyne, esq. of Barbadoes, by whom he had four sons; William-Henry, who married Bridget, daughter of James, earl of Morton; Bartholomew, who married MaryWyndham, daughter of James Everard Arundell, third son of Henry, lord Arundell, of Wardour; and Edward, who married first Catherine Murray, eldest daughter of John, earl of Dunmore; and secondly, Arabella, daughter of admiral Sir Chaloner Ogle. His third wife was Anne, relict of Anthony Duncombe, lord Faversham, and daughter of Sir Thomas Hales, bart. of Bekesborne, by whom he had two daughters, who both died young. He was succeeded in titles and estates by his eldest son, the right hon. Jacob Pleydell Bouverie, earl of Radnor, who is the present possessor of these manors of Folkestone and Walton, with the park-house and disparked grounds adjacent to it, formerly the antient park of Folkestone, the warren, and other manors and estates in this parish and neighbourhood.

      From: 'The town and parish of Folkestone', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 8 (1799), pp. 152-188. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63472&strquery=arcis. Date accessed: 03 December 2007.

      THE MANOR OF TIRLINGHAM, with ACKHANGER, the former of which is situated in the northern or uphill part of this parish, was antiently of very eminent account. In the reign of the Conqueror it seems, with its appendage of Ackhanger, situated in the adjoining parish of Cheriton, to have been held by Nigell de Muneville, and to have passed from him in like manner as has been mentioned before, to the family of Albrincis, or Averenches, and to have made up together the barony of Averenches, or Folkestone, as it was afterwards called, of which barony the manor of Tirlingham, with Ackhanger, was a principal limb; and as such it afterwards passes, in like manner as above-described, from William de Albrincis, and his descendants, to the Crevequers, which family ending in king Henry III.'s reign in four daughters and coheirs, of whom Agnes, the eldest, married to John de Sandwich; and Eleanor, to Bertram de Crioll, entitled their respective husbands, the former as being the eldest, to the manors of Folkestone and Walton, with a moiety of the hundred, and likewife to the castle of Folkestone, as the caput baroniæ, or chief seat of the barony, and the latter to these manors of Tirlingham and Ackhanger, the next principal part of it, with the other moiety of the hundred; the other two sisters most probably sharing other parts of the inheritance, which lay at a distance elsewhere. Bertram de Crioll died possessed of these manors, and the moiety of the hundred, in the 23d year of king Edward I. Joane, his daughter, on the death of her brothers s.p. became heir to their inheritance, which she carried in marriage to Sir Richard de Rokesle, who lest two daughters his coheirs; (fn. 8) each of whom seem to have entitled their respective husbands to these manores, in undivided moieties; but at length the whole of them became vested in Michael, son of Thomas de Poynings, by Agnes his wife, the eldest of them. He died in the 43d year of king Edward III. possessed of this manor, and a moiety of the hundred, held in capite, and by the service of reparing and maintaining a moiety of a hall and campel in Dover castle, at his own expence, and of paying to the great and small wards of the castle, and to the aid of the sheriff of Kent yearly, for the ferme of the said moiety of the hundred; and he held in like manner the manor of Newington Bertram, as parcel of the manor of Tirligham. In his descendants they continued down to Robert de Poynings, who died possessed of them anno 25 Henry VI. On which the inheritance of them devolved to Alice, daughter of Richard his eldest son, who died in his life-time, wife of Henry, lord Percy, afterwards on his father's death earl of Northumberland; in whose descendants they continued down to Henry, earl of Northumberland, who died in the 29th year of king Henry VIII. s. p. having the year before, by deed inrolled in the Augmentationoffice, granted all his estates to the king, in case he died without male issue. These manors thus coming into the hands of the crown, were granted thence soon afterwards to Thomas, lord Cromwell, earl of Essex; on whose attainder in the 32d of that reign they reverted again to the crown, whence they were afterwards granted to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, together with the manors of Folkestone, Walton, Woolverton, and Halton, the hundred of Folkestone, and several other manors and estates in this and the adjoining parishes; all which he next year passes away by sale to Mr. Henry Herdson; since which they have passed, in manner as has been already more particulary mentioned, and are now together in the possession of the right honorable Jacob Pleydell Bouverie, earl of Radnor.

      From: 'The town and parish of Folkestone', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 8 (1799), pp. 152-188. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63472&strquery=albrincis. Date accessed: 05 December 2007.

      BERTRAM'S, now usually called Newington Bertram, is another manor, lying adjoining to the former one of Newington Belhouse, and seems to have been antiently a part of the barony of Averenches, or Folkestone, and an appendage to the manor of Tirlingham, in Folkestone, parcel of it. From the family of Averenches, or Albrincis, it passed, in like manner with that of Tirlingham above-mentioned, till the 1st year of queen Mary, when it was granted, with the adjoining manor of Newington Belhouse, and other estates in this neighbourhood, to Edward, lord Clinton and Saye, to hold in capite, who next year sold them to Mr.Henry Herdson, since which they have passed in like manner as has been mentioned above down to Jame Drake Brockman, esq. now of Beechborough, the present possessor of them.

      From: 'Parishes: Newington', The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 8 (1799), pp. 197-210. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63474&strquery=averenches. Date accessed: 05 December 2007.

      “A FINAL CONCORD”.

      This is a direct extract from Planche’s “A Corner of Kent”, pages 41 to 47 inc.

      Of this great family ( i.e. d’Avranches ), from whom descended, by female heirs, nearly all the large estates in this part of the country to the families of Crevecoeur, Criol, and Sandwich, the most imperfect and inaccurate pedigrees have hitherto been published. Considerable light has been thrown upon it and it’s early connections by the recent publication of two very valuable original documents by the Kentish Archaeological Society ; the first being specially interesting to us, as it shows the descent of this very property in Fleet, which we have seen was vested in William d’Arques at the time of the great survey, and, consequently, fills up the gap which Hasted describes as existing between that period and the reign of Henry III.

      It is a legal agreement, called “ a Final Concord,” of the eighth year of the reign of Richard I.,A.D. 1197, between Elias de Beauchamp and Constance de Bolbec, his wife, plaintiffs, on the one part, and Ruellinus de Abrincis (Avranches)* tenant, on the other, concerning half a knight’s fee, with its appurtenances, at Fleet. The above-named persons agree that a moiety of the aforesaid knight’s fee, with the lordship, shall remain in the hands of Elias and Constance his wife, and their heirs ; “to wit, a capital messuage and all the lands within the walls of Ratteburg (the name by which Richborough was now known), and one acre which is outside the walls towards the south of the western entrance of the wall ; and the eastern part of the field called Cnolla ; and the northern part of the field which is north of the aforesaid field called Cnolla ; and the northern part of the field called Claure ; and the southern part of the field to the south of the Thornbushes ; and the northern part of the field which is northward of Hoga ; and the southern part of the field called Nollis ; and the western part of the field called Scantegas ; and the western part of the field which is to the north of the road which reaches to the walls of Ratteburg ; and the eastern part of the field called Staldingburg ; and the southern part of Hoga ; and the western part of . . . . . . and the north part of the field called Stepatra ; and the western part of one acre which is to the south of the houses of the Lady Isabella. Moreover, these men remain to the aforesaid Elias and Constance his wife, and their heirs . . . . . . Settlee, with all his holding and service ; Estrilda, the wife of Wlfi, with all her holding and service ; Luke and Philip, the sons of Wlfi, with all their holding and service ; Nicholas Fitz-Wimund, with ten acres of his holding . . . . . . Jordan of Flete, with all his holding and service, excepting the moiety of service which he owes for tenants’ cart service ; Edric le Sauner, with all his holding and service, and a moiety of the service . . . . . . of Walter Hassard ; to wit, for the eastern part of his holding ; and for the service of Alice the Angevine (or of Anjou) ; three pence halfpenny, and half the service of Roger Bulege ; and for the revenue of Libricus Fitz-Richard, three pence three farthings.

      “And for Ruellinus de Avranches, and his heirs, there remains his messuage in the field which is to the south from the Thornbushes, and all the land where the thorns are, to wit, of the above-named half knight’s fee . . . . . . it belongs to Ruellinus de Avranches . . . . . . next to the Mill ; and the western part of the field called Cnolla ; and the southern-part of the field to the north of the aforesaid field of Cnolla ; and the southern part . . . . . . The part of the field to the south of the Thornbushes ; and the southern part of the field to the north of Hoga ; and the northern part of the field called Noll ; and the eastern part of the field . . . . . . The part of the field which is to the north from the road to which reaches to the walls of Ratteburg ; and the northern part of the field which is to the south of the wall of Ratteburg . . . . . . and . . . . . . the part of the field called Staldingburga ; and the northern part of Iioga ; and the eastern part of Pasture ; and the southern part of the field called Stepatra ; and the eastern part of one acre which is to the south of the houses . . . . . .

      “ Moreover, Alan de Berelinge remains to Ruellinus de Avranches , with all his holding and service ; and Albrea, wife of Godwin, with all her holding and service ; and William le Scot, with all his holding . . . . . . Humphrey and roger, sons of Wlwinus, with all their holding and service ; Hugo Fitz-Eluric with all his holding and service ; and the homage of Nicholas Fitz-Wimund de v. . . . . . . are towards the north, near the field called Scantega ; Mathew, son of Osbert, with all his holding and service ; and half the service and revenue of Walter Hassard, to wit, for the western . . . . . . and for the service of Alice the Angevine two pence halfpenny ; and half the service of Roger de Bulege ; and for the holding of Ederic ** Fitz-Richard one penny three farthings, and two hens, and a moiety of service . . . . . . da . . . . . . to wit . . . . . . . owes for tenant cart service.

      “ And be it known that a whole moiety in the marshes and saltpits, with all the other appurtenances that belong to the above-named half knight’s fee, remain to Elias de Beauchamp and his wife, and their heirs ; and the other moiety remains to Ruellinus de Avranches and his heirs, with all its appurtenances, and the forstall *** which is before the gate of the court is between . . . . . . Elias de Beauchamp received the homage of the aforesaid Ruellinus for all the holdings described, which remain to the same Ruellinus , to be held by him and his heirs of the aforesaid Elias and Constance his wife, and of their heirs, for the service of a fourth part of a knight’s fee ; and for this fine and agreement Ruellinus de Avranches gave to Elias de Beauchamp and Constance his wife ten silver marks.”

      We are sure it is not necessary to apologize to our least erudite readers for the insertion of this document in extenso, replete as it is with local and personal information of the greatest interest. Notwithstanding the tantalizing lacunae which here and there occur in the manuscript, we learn from it the names of twenty individuals who held lands in Fleet in the reign of Richard Coeur de Lion, and nearly all of whom were living on the 4th of June, 1197, when this agreement was solemnly entered into at Westminster before Hubert, Archbishop of Canterbury ; Ralph, Bishop of Hereford ; and Richard, Bishop of Ely ; Master Thomas de Husseburne, Richard de Heriet, Osbert Fitz-Hervey, Simon de Pateshull, Oger Fitz-Oger, justices ; and other faithful servants of the King being then present. Amongst the names of the under-tenants we find that of Alan de Berelinge, reminding us of Bereling Street, in this parish, and that persons are still living in the neighbourhood who bear this name ; of Jordan de Flete, apparently the most considerable landowner, as he had his surname from the manor itself. The Saxon names of Godwin, Ulfi or Ulsi, and Wulwin or Wulfin, probably those of descendants of families settled there long before the Norman occupation.****


      Footnotes referred to in this extract………………..

      * The Ruellinus de Abrincis named in this document has never appeared in any pedigree of the family of D’Avranches. From the other interesting record to which we have just alluded, we infer that he was the brother of Simon d’Avranches, plaintiff, or appelant in a trial by wager of battle with Baldwin, Comte de Guisnes, 10th February, 1201, respecting the right to some lands in Newington ; for there can be no doubt that the hiatus in the MS. Should be filled up thus :- “Inter Simonem de Avranches petentem per Roelland. Fratrem suum.” - (Archaeol. Cant. Vol. Ii. P.265.) This name, which was that of his grandfather, who married Maud de Muneville, heiress of Folkestone, being most capriciously spelt, not only Roellandus, Ruellinus, Roelent, Rualo, and Ruallon, but also Graalandus and Graelent. In a document of the date 1127, printed by Mr Boys in his “Collections for the History of Sandwich,”pp. 551-3, the name of the grandfather is corrupted into Ruerent de Aurences, and in the “Rot. Curiae Regis,” 9th and 10th of Richard I., that of the grandson is indifferently given as Grelant, Rohelandus, and Rolandus. It has subsided into the more familiar form of Roland.
      ** Previously called Libricus Fitz-Richard.
      *** Forstall signified a grass plot in front of a gateway : several families have received the name of Forstall from owning or residing near one. “Fostal, a paddock to a large house or a way leading thereto. Sussex” - (Halliwell, Archaic Dict.)
      **** Just seventy years previous to this date we find the names of Willfin de Bocklande, Sirent filius Godwyne, and Wolfwyne filius Coke, amongst those of grave old men of good reputation, “de provincie circa Sandwicum.”-(Boys’s Coll. P.552.)


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      Another few words of explanation (again quoting from Planche.)

      The “Lady Isabella” (referred to in paragraph two) was the sister of Constance, wife of Elias de Beauchamp, one of the parties to the agreement. Isabella and Constance were daughters and co-heirs of Walter de Bolbec. By the Pipe Roll of the second of Richard I. (six years previous to the above agreement), we find that Earl Alberic de Vere * rendered account to the King of 500 marks for the daughter of Walter de Bolbec, to give her to his, Alberic’s, son in marriage ; and by the Pipe Roll of the ninth of John, A.D. 1208, that Robert de Vere gave the King 200 marks and three palfreys, to have Y[sabella] de Bolbec in marriage. The Lady Isabella then, about eleven years after the date of the Final Concord, became the wife of Robert de Vere, afterwards third Earl of Oxford, and who died fifth of Henry III. 1221.

      * This Alberic de Vere was the first husband of Beatrice, only daughter and heir of Rose (or Sibilla as she is sometimes called) de Guisnes and Henri Castellan de Bourbourg, and grand-daughter of Emma d’Arques, by her first husband Manasses Comte de Guisnes. Vide Chapter V., in which the singular confusion existing in the genealogy of the De Veres is examined, and an attempt made to reconcile the conflicting evidence.
    Person ID I17  Hougham
    Last Modified 6 Dec 2007 

    Father d'Averanches, William
              b. 1037, Avranches Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1087, Oakhampton Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years) 
    Mother Fitzgilbert de Brionne, Emma 
    Family ID F16  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family De Monville, Matilda or Maud 
    Children 
    +1. d'Averanches, William Lord of Folkestone
              d. 1190
    +2. Hougham, Robert The First
              b. Between 1140 - 1160, Dover Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. Bef 1230  (Age ~ 69 years)
     3. Meso ??
    Family ID F21  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart