Huffam, Timotheos Blake

Huffam, Timotheos Blake

Male 1849 - 1939  (90 years)

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  • Name Huffam, Timotheos Blake 
    Born 4 Jan 1849  Isle of Wight Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 4 Oct 1939  Richmond New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • On 1851 census living with parents


      On 1861 census living with parents


      Died New Zealand
      Artistic Many sketches and writings published in newspapers.For some time a serial titled my many yesteryears had a prominent page.
      "in 1862 moved with parents fron yeovil to west cowes isle of wight" it was whilst here his mother and baby sister died
      on 10 dec 1868 father bought a middle section of the barque Fanny bound for New Zealand after 130 days at sea on 19 april 1869
      we entered blind bay new Zealand."

      Timothy had an old trunk not opened for 60 years the contents of which provides the basis for this record

      Obituary of T. Blake HUFFAM
      As reported in the Nelson Evening Mail, 1939

      The death of Mr. T. Blake Huffam at the age of 90 which occurred at Richmond yesterday removes a well-known and highly respected resident of the Nelson district.
      In may ways the late Mr. Huffam was a law unto himself, both in his mode of living and in the choice of his hobbies. As he always said, he was a believer in the simple life, but in his case this had reference to his diet mainly, and his worldly needs. His mind was always receptive and the arts, particularly music and painting, claimed much of his attention.

      For a long number of years, Mr. Huffam was a consistent supporter of the Nelson Harmonic Society Orchestra in various capacities, in more recent years with the drums, and he was a frequent exhibitor at the Suter Art Gallery exhibitions. For many years he was secretary of the Nelson School of Music.

      His advent to New Zealand which was as far back as 1869 meant a great change in the lives for the Huffam family for they left Cowes and all the activity of that famous yachting and fashionable centre, in which the family took no unimportant part, for seclusion and primitive habitation of Bark Bay near Astrolabe. There the family settled for sixteen years and old settlers of Motueka have recalled the visits of the Huffam long-boat to that port, with the four Huffam boys at the oars, and the father in the stern sheets, rowing as if in procession at a Cowes regatta.

      Mr. Huffam often said it was those boyhood years at Bark Bay that gave him his love of nature and laid the foundation of that robust constitution which enabled him to take long journeys over adjacent mountains when well over eighty years of age.

      The late Mr. Huffam was a great lover of Charles Dickens, and there was an interesting family tie with the great author for an uncle of his was godfather to Dickens who had the Huffam name incorporated in his own — Charles John Huffam Dickens.

      For many years Mr. Huffam was in business in Nelson as a music and piano seller until some twenty years ago when he sold out to Messrs Chas. Begg and Co. Mr Huffam then went to live at Richmond and he took a keen interest in the Jersey breed of cattle and was the first secretary of the Nelson Jersey Cattle Breeders? Club. His genial personality — Mr. Huffam was friendly to all — enabled him to extend interest in the club in many ways.

      Mr. Huffam?s wife predeceased him by some years as did also a son, Mr. Jule Huffam who died in the Great War, and a daughter Miss Dorothy Huffam. Mr. Huffam leaves two daughters, Miss Runa Huffam, of Richmond, and Mrs. Whiteside of Colville, Coromandel and one son Mr. Blake Huffam of Ikamatua (West Coast).

      Messrs Gerard and Fred Huffam, of Motueka, are surviving brothers. His other brother, Mr. Richard Huffam, of Wellington, died some years ago.

      In the course of some interesting reminiscences contributed to ?The Mail? in 1932, Mr. Huffam said:-

      On the 19th of April, having been 130 days on the voyage, we entered Blind Bay at the same time as H. M. S. Galatea which we easily recognised, having often seen her in the Cowes roads. Her commander was the Duke of Edinburgh, a son of Queen Victoria. He landed at 10:30am under a salute of 21 guns from the Galatea. Nelson city was having a lively holiday, all shops being closed. Most of the citizens were about the wharves to welcome the Prince. The Lady Barkly, then a paddle-wheel, with other coasters, was busy conveying passengers to and from the Galatea.

      Next day the races were held adjoining the old Turf Hotel at Stoke, so no business could be done. The Prince left in the morning. The Lady Barkly towed our barque to the wharf. Next day was the second day of the races. On 23rd April we hired a cottage near the Raglan brewery at 8s a week.

      On Sunday, 9th May, we walked to the Stoke Wesleyan Church, and were much amused to see a man with a basin coming from the Turf Inn to the church. This was for the Sacrament of Christening. Mr Crump was the minister and preached a very interesting sermon.

      We saw and were all much impressed by the mighty mountains, as neither my brothers or myself had ever seen anything like them in the Old Country, and the tree ferns near the Brook Street reservoir about 20ft high were a complete revelation, as we had never seen anything so beautiful.

      We heard a gun fired one day, and were told that on the arrival of an English mail in Nelson the citizens were notified in this way.

      Outwardly we boys did not notice much difference between the Nelson population and that of the old English town we had just left, but when one was able to enter into their lives we observed great differences, the good feeling between all class; the absence of conventionality; the hospitality everywhere, the bright sunshine which seemed to have pervaded everybody and everything was a revelation to us, and we enjoyed everything immensely.

      T. Blake HUFFAM
      (1849-1939)

      T. Blake was born on 14 June 1849, apparently in Cowes, on the Isle of Wight, off the coast of England. His father was Timothy HUFFAM, a brewer by trade, and his mother Catherine BLAKE, from a family of brewers. T. Blake was the eldest of four sons. There may have been a sister, Mary (who would have been the youngest), but little is known of her. It is a fact however, that Catherine died on the 12th of February 1862, when T. Blake was just 12. It may have been this death, among other things, that compelled his father Timothy, to pack up his four sons and leave England, never to return.
      T. Blake lived at Bark Bay with his three brothers and father from 1869 until about 1885, when on the 20th of June, he married Jane JACOBSEN. He was 36 and she was 21. They shared a common interest - painting, and some of their descendants display paintings by one or the other in their homes. T. Blake and Jane had five children - Julius Valentine Blake (Jule or Jules to the family), Dorothea, Runa, Iva and Blake. Both Jules and Dorothea died young - Jules in 1919 (aged 30) in Cologne, Germany during World War One, and Dorothea in 1912 as a result of influenza. She was only 21.

      T. Blake wrote a series of articles for the Nelson Evening Mail in 1932. They show an intelligent and highly resourceful family.

      My Many Yesterdays - Number One

      The first notable event in my young life was about the year 1853 riding in an old-fashioned stage coach from some town in Hampshire towards Yeovil in Somersetshire.
      In the outside seat at the rear was a gentleman with a trumpet who, when nearing a stage, made good use of it, advertising the fact that the coach was coming and all folks must get out of our way. The next scene was of passengers bustling, ostlers taking the travelled horses out and harnessing up fresh ones. At this period practically all travel was per the medium of the coach and I believe the L. S. W. R. was being constructed.

      In 1858 while living at Yeovil Donati?s comet appeared and was a magnificent and awe-inspiring object. It seemed to me to reach from a few degrees above the horizon to more than halfway overhead. I have seen Halley?s and others but Donati?s appeared more magnificent than any. The star ?Arcturus? seen through the comet?s tail was a most interesting sight, showing how almost inconceivably tenuous the tail was, as the start was bright though covered by a few million miles of tail. Should anyone be interested, this comet is due again in 3808.

      There was a chemist?s shop in the high street. The front window was nearly full of pickle bottles containing tape worms and other unsightly reptiles which I used to gaze at with a considerable amount of awe. About the year 1860 the owner figured in a police case and was punished for obtaining money for using magical incantations over somebody?s cow which he persuaded the owner had been bewitched.

      I well remember my father one Sunday morning taking my brother and I for a walk into the country for 21/2 miles where we entered a conventicle erected by a certain body of the people who dissented from the doctrines of the established church, and for that reason were prohibited from worshipping within 21/2 miles of the above church. This was a conventicle which would hold perhaps 50 persons. Apparently the building was constructed to serve the towns of Yeovil and Sherbourne, the combined population at that time being approximately 14,000.

      YACHTING AT COWES

      In 1862 my family left Yeovil and took up residence in Cowes in the Isle of Wight, then the greatest yachting centre of the world and close to the marine home of the greatest ruler in the world. Here we had great opportunities of seeing famous people amongst whom were, Earl Cardigan, leader of the celebrated Balaklava charge, Mr. G. R. Stephenson, nephew of the great George Stephenson who succeeded to his uncle?s large ironmasters business on the Tyne. He had an enormous income and owned several yachts, one a large steamship, the Northumbria of, I should guess 700 or 800 tons, a schooner yacht the ?Tyne? of about 150 tons and a smaller one the cutter the St Lawrence. Some of the owners of large yachts were nominated a few times for membership of ?The Royal Yacht Squadron? but if in trade were blackballed by this most exclusive club. I believe that finally most were accepted. All the seamen on Mr Stephenson?s yacht were musical and organised into a good military band with a professional teacher and conductor. This band used to give open air concerts on the W. Cowes Esplanade band stand. Both the Esplanade and the band stand were gifts of Mr Stephenson.

      ROYALTY AT CHURCH

      One Sunday morning my father took my brother and I to the churchyard of Whippingham Church were the Queen went to worship. Some German notabilities were staying at Osborne at that time, and just before the service ended a side door opened and a blackcoated procession filed out. First the old German Emporer (he was not Emporer of Germany then) his wife, Prince Frederick Charles and his wife (our Princess Royal) and two or three smaller princelings, one of whom must have been the present ex-Kaiser. Last of all came our Queen. As a boy I felt rather sold. They all looked so very human and ordinary. In church the Queen?s pew was so placed that she could see the minister, but the congregation (a good many of whom attended to see the Queen) could see very little of her. Besides, she and her friends always left just before the closing of the service.

      About 1866 Garibaldi paid a visit to W. Cowes to be the guest of Sir Chas. Seely M. P., who lived at Freshwater. Several hundreds of workpeople were let off to see him and there was great excitement. He must have been tired out with bowing and shaking hands. On the wharf his horses were taken out, the working men seized the shafts and hauled the carriage and party for about a mile to just past our house where I can still see him with his red blouse, loose necktie and beard, standing up and bowing to the cheering crowd.

      AMERICAN YACHT RACE

      On Christmas Eve 1866 a notable event happened. Three or four families including our own were having Christmas festivities at the fine home of Mr. John White, a well-known ship builder of that time. A private American yacht race was on just then from the United States of America to Cowes in which the yachting world was keenly interested. While we were all having a good time about 7:30, in came Mr. White with three American gentlemen: ?Ladies and gentlemen, allow me to introduce to you Mr. James Gordon Bennett, Mr. Jerome and Mr. Fiske,? he said. ?They have just arrived from New York in the winning yacht Henrietta.?

      Great sports they must have been. Mr. Bennett was proprietor of the ?New York Herald? newspaper. In 1870 Mr. Bennett financed Stanley to hunt up Livingstone in South Africe — a most graceful act to Britain. He also supplied the funds for Stanley?s journey across Africa via the Congo i1874-78.

      To return — In the morning the three competing yachts were safely anchored in Cowes roads. The American gentlemen told us that Fleetwing, being the fastest boat, should have won, but we afterwards learnt, six men of her crew were swept overboard in a storm,a nd heaving to immediately for a few hours she lost the race. The men were never recovered.

      After the introduction the grown ups retired from the party and enjoyed a wonderful and most interesting conversation together, presumably as clever folk do now, setting the worlds affairs in order. It has never been right since.

      NAVAL EXPERIMENTS

      Another event was the testing of Captain Cowper Coles?s invention of revolving gun turrets. We were invoted to see the fun by Mr. John White who had chartered a steamship and made up a party. The ironclad to be tested was, if my memory is correct, the Royal Sovereign and was moored broadside on to another ironclad. The two boats were say half a mile or so apart, and the Royal Sovereign was blazed away at by the other, the guns being trained on the turrets (no blank cartridges) as we could see the destruction caused. At that time Great Britain was probably the only power which could afford such destructive experiments on her own ships.

      The Solent was alive with yachts and steamers watching the event and one of the yacjht owners complained in the local newspaper that her sails were pierced by the firing. Very coarse nuggety gunpowder was used and it seemed that some of the nuggets were not burnt. An ironclad The Captain was designed with a very low freeboard. She turned bottom up in a gale off Cape Finisterre in 1870 when nearly all on board including Captain Coles were drowned.

      Another nautical event was the arrival at Cowes of a raft the Nonpareil which had crossed the Atlantic from the United States of America. This raft was made of 3 india rubber tubes pointed at both ends each tube about 20 inches in diameter and 16 feet long. There was an open framework of timber on top and in the centre there was a small tent about 6 feet by 4 feet for the crew which consisted of two men and a dog. The raft was schooner rigged. It was a remarkable and very risky voyage and must have been uncomfortable.

      The sea came right up to our premise at the back at Cowes and yachts often used to moor a few chains away. One day I saw a yacht?s boat (gig is the proper term) arrive at a yacht, a chair was lowered to the boat and an elderly gentleman was hoisted on board. On asking my father what this meant he informed me that the gentleman who owned the yacht was named Kavanagh and was a very remarkable man as he was born without arms or legs and could write, shoot and yacht and do other things and, moreover, was a member of the British Parliament and was a very outstanding instance of what perserverance will do in overcoming almost insuperable obstacles. I think a good account of this very remarkable gentleman would be found in any good biographical dictionary.

      My Many Yesterdays - Number Two

      AMERICAN CIVIL WAR
      In or about 1863, while the American civil war was in progress, a Federal ironclad The Nashville was chased by the Confederate cruiser Tuscarora into the Solent. The Nashville fled into Southampton, the Tuscarora waiting for her in Cowes roads where she stayed for some time. She waited to chase the Nashville outside the three mile fighting limit and then to engage with her. Soon after this a naval fight between the Confederate Alabama and the Federal Kearsage took place in the English Channel in which the Alabama was sunk. The survivors were rescued and brought to Cowes by the private yacht Deerhound. Great Britain had to pay over 3,000,000 pounds for the damage caused by the Alabama as she was built at Birkenhead, England.

      GLADSTONE

      About this time, 1864, my father was nominated and legally compelled, with two other inhabitants of West Cowes, to collect the town?s income tax. One was an invalid chemist, almost useless, the other an agricultural labourer who was absolutely unused to any sort of business. Anyhow it was impossible for my father to complete the collecting by the stated time.

      At a certain period he had to report to the head man a few miles away. He was a knight and a celebrity. The result was that for being behind in the work this head man said: ?Mr Huffam we fine you 10 pounds.? Father rose from his seat, marched up to this big noise and fired at him ?Who are you to fine me 10 pounds as if I were a criminal, I will not pay it.? On arriving home father at once wrote a full account of the affair to Gladstone, then, I believe, Chancellor of the Exchequer.

      Going down again in a few days to report, he met this almighty commissioner on the way. He took off his hat to father and said: ?O Mr Huffam, I am so pleased to meet you, my house and grounds are close by and I should be pleased to have wine with you and show you my pictures.? ?Hullo? thought father, ?what has happened now?? Next he met the commissioners secretary, who said ?Mr Huffam we have had a bombshell, a stinging letter from Gladstone which has frightened the whole lot of us.? No more was said about the 10 pounds. When father got home there was a letter from Gladstone stating what he had done also that he was taking measures to carry out father?s recommendation, viz., that it was a wrong principle that the residents should collect their own income tax and that it should be collected by the exciseman. That is, I understand, how it has since been collected.

      METEORIC SHOWER OF 1866

      But the most remarkable and outstanding event of my life and of many persons who witnessed it was the wonderful meteoric shower of 13th November 1866. The newspapers advertised that on that night a very unusual meteoric display starting at about 11 or 11:30pm would be visible so of course we all sat up. The meteors were punctual and increased in number till about 12:30 after which the numbers began to dwindle. It was a most magnificent and wonderful display, and it was estimated, or guessed rather, that probably 240,000 were visible in that short time — so numerous that it seemed imposssible to count them. There was a point in the constellation Leo from which that meteors radiated and rapidly moved all over the heavens. Astronomers tell us that the evidence seems to prove that these meteors are the remains of a disintegrated comet (Tempel?s) which had an elliptical orbit reaching out to the planet Uranus and revolving around the sun. Owing to planetary attraction the tail was pulled to pieces by the planets or a planet of our system and the tail is now distributed all over its orbit forming an elliptical ring many million miles in extent. Every November the earth dashes through this ring and on the 13th or 14th a few meteors are generally visible. One part of this ring is, however, larger and denser than the rest and every 33 years the earth dashes through this particular part. It only takes 3 or 4 hours to do this so that if it takes place in the day time there is absolutely nothing to be seen. There should be another display this next November. Perhaps some of our local astronomers could inform us as to the probabilities of seeing this marvelous display. So far I have only come across two people who have seen it, the late Mr C. Y. Fell and the late Mr. Campbell Ellis. I trust this bit of very elementary astronomy will be excused, but if any person saw this display and did not wish to know more about it, he or she must be devoid of all reasonable curiosity.

      I was brought up to take an interest in our natural environment and to educate my powers of observation when out for walks with my father. One afternoon my brother and I saw and earmarked what looked like some large lobster shells in a quarry by the roadside three or four miles from our Yeovil home. At our first opportunity we hurried off to investigate these objects more fully. The result was three fine ammonites, the largest I should guess eighteen inches in diameter and the smallest ten inches. The total weight was roughly 50 or 60 lbs. We were struggling with these when along came a timber lorry which kindly offered to take us; so we rode home in triumph to find the family anxious, as no-one knew where we were and it was a long way past the dinner hour.

      These fossils were placed just outside our back door and father one day was showing them to two gentlemen who wanted it explained to them what these curious objects were so they were told that a few hundred thousand years ago these things were alive swimming in the sea etc etc. Father overheard one man say to the younger one ?Don?t you believe him he is pulling your leg. The whole thing is absurd.?

      ELECTIONS OF 100 YEARS AGO

      Father once told me of an experience of his when a small boy. It was election time in the old country and his father had something to say or do for the candidate at the hustings, which was a temporary platform on which political candidates stated their views. My father was there and he well remembered that while the speeches were in full swing the listening crowds below were tumbling down helpless. Right up to the hustings came a gang of prizefighters who were subsidised by the rival candidate to spoil the other man?s speeches. At those times over 100 year ago, it was a very forcible and useful argument. The Eatanswill election as described by Dickens in ?Pickwick Papers? was not a bit overdrawn.

      The great tragic and Shakespearean actor of Convent Graden and Drury Lane theatres, Mr. W. C. Macready, lived in retirement near Yeovil and my father used to see a great deal of him. In his house he had many rare and curious objects, valuable pictures, trophies and presents from all the crowned heads of Europe. Many of these were availble for an exhibition of fine art in Yeovil of which my father was secretary. Macready also gave most effective readings from the best authors and was always ready to help in any good work of this sort. He told my father that although he had two fine daughters he had never allowed them to see him on stage.

      My Many Yesterdays - Number Three

      OFF TO NEW ZEALAND

      Our next move was to New Zealand on 10th December 1868. My father bought a midship section of the Shaw Saville Company?s barque Fanny. We put all our goods into this and fitted it up with bunks and necessary furniture and left St. Katherine docks in charge of a pilot and tugboat. When off Gravesend we collided with a coal-laden brig and cut her down to the waters edge, the crew having only just time to save themselves; and we smashed our jibboom. Our captain speedily got another one made and made tracks for the open sea. A succession of heavy south-west gales kept us floundering and tumbling in the English Channel for over three weeks. The captain would not put in anywhere as the authorities would be sure to detain him for running into the brig at Gravesend. However, we never heard any more of the matter. Getting into more genial weather we all enjoyed it. When becalmed in the tropics we made a hooped net, filled a tub with sea water and netted different marine fish, sea weeds and creatures, having a good deal of fun thereby. There were the usual flying fish (Portugese men of war), bonitas, albatrosses and porpoises. We had two quadrants with us and an almanack so we used to work out our latitude. It was great fun comparing our observations with the captain?s. We were not always right as the eye required a certain amount of education. The albacore were very interesting — some we guessed to weigh 200lbs. In daytime chasing the flying fish their iridescent bodies gleaming in the sunshine was a most fascinating spectacle and at night their movements were visible by the phospherescence of the sea. The South East trades caught us with a snort in 2 degrees north and a 9 knot breeze. Two days afterwards we crossed the line on 7th February 1869.
      On the 13th of February at 10pm we heard the second mate yell out ?Port your helm!? It appears we were careering along without lights when another vessel before the wind nearly smashed into us. She had no lights either. Afterwards two other vessels passed us very closely. After this our ships lights were put in their place.

      OFF TRINIDAD

      On 17th February the Isle of Trinidad was visible on our port bow about 12 miles off. This very rocky and peaked island belongs to Brazil, which is 700 miles west. To many it is a most interesting island, partly because there are no harbours and consequently very difficult of access, and also for the report that it contains pirates? buried treasure. It is a small island about six miles round, but is 2200ft high.

      In Lat 34S the seabirds came to see us, the albatross, mollyhawk, Cape hens and petrels gracefully and very majestically gliding and gyrating all round the barque in a most enthralling manner.

      I should have mentioned that we made a small swing table in our cabin on which the ordinary movements of the barque everything was quite safe. We used to play chess on it.

      ARRIVAL IN BLIND BAY

      On the 19th of April, having been 130 days on the voyage, we entered Blind Bay at the same time as H. M. S. Galatea which we easily recognised, having often seen her in the Cowes roads. Her commander was the Duke of Edinburgh, a son of Queen Victoria. He landed at 10:30am under a salute of 21 guns from the Galatea. Nelson city was having a lively holiday, all shops being closed. Most of the citizens were about the wharves to welcome the Prince. The Lady Barkly, then a paddle-wheel, with other coasters, was busy conveying passengers to and from the Galatea.

      Next day the races were held adjoining the old Turf Hotel at Stoke, so no business could be done. The Prince left in the morning. The Lady Barkly towed our barque to the wharf. Next day was the second day of the races. On 23rd April we hired a cottage near the Raglan brewery at 8s a week.

      VISIT TO STOKE

      On Sunday, 9th May, we walked to the Stoke Wesleyan Church, and were much amused to see a man with a basin coming from the Turf Inn to the church. This was for the Sacrament of Christening. Mr Crump was the minister and preached a very interesting sermon.

      We saw and were all much impressed by the mighty mountains, as neither my brothers or myself had ever seen anything like them in the Old Country, and the tree ferns near the Brook Street reservoir about 20ft high were a complete revelation, as we had never seen anything so beautiful.

      We heard a gun fired one day, and were told that on the arrival of an English mail in Nelson the citizens were notified in this way.

      A COMPARISON

      Outwardly we boys did not notice much difference between the Nelson population and that of the old English town we had just left, but when one was able to enter into their lives we observed great differences, the good feeling between all class; the absence of conventionality; the hospitality everywhere, the bright sunshine which seemed to have pervaded everybody and everything was a revelation to us, and we enjoyed everything immensely.

      MHP Writes:-

      Correspondence with Timothy Blake Huffam Richmond,Nelson,New Zealand.-Extracts-."Mrs Clara Huffam of Canterbury, New Zealand was wife of John Huffam ,who was a son of Alfred Meek Huffam.John died in N.Z.about 8 years ago. Alfred Meek Hufifam early last century was a very well known painter and engraver.-my father Timothy Huffam was a brother to this artist-another brother Theophilus also an engraver."John Huffam received a good ohart from his bro.in Berwick-Mrs Brown is a daughter of John Huffam"-"Alfred Meek Huffam died in I895,aged 9l, his son Walter b.1847,last heard of in 1878 in San Francisco.-I have brother Frederick Walter aged 82,and Gerard Scudamore age 78,living about 24 miles from here.-the name Scudamore is from Lord Scudamore,who was ambassador at the Court of France,and introduced Milton there.he was related to the Meek family.Joseph Huffam married Sarah Meek.

      My brother Richard died about 8 years ago in Wellington,N.Z.leaving four sons and two daughters-2 of the sons died. Of my family of 5 children,1 Julius died at the war.l daughter died l9l2,and 3 left,my son Blake is married and happy,1 daughter md a Mr Whiteside is living at New Plymouth,he is a school teacher,my other daughter Runa is not married,she keeps house for me.My wife died last September after 47 years of happy married life.I was 84 last Jany." slgned-T.Blake Huffam.

      1933.Sep.26."Am enclosing the pedigree forms that you sent-filled out as far as possible.My Grandmother,Mrs Joseph Huffam(nee Sarak Meek)was connected with the Scudamores-Viscount Soudamore's family was quite outstanding,they were very wealthy-Duke of Norfolk,had a finger in the pie-some of Scudamores wealth was thrown into Chancery. Houghams amorial bearings seem to show a Scandinavian origen-we seem to have utilized the adversity part of our motto.-I am sending you my life story as printed and published by me in our paper here.-I find Henry H. a son of Solomon H.md Lydia Hunt of Cant.d.l785,he had son Henry of Tenterdon md Jane,b.1743 d.l8l8-should you wish for further information on Huffam ancestry,if you write to Mr Edward Valentine Huffam,The Cottage, 119 High St.Berwick on Tweed,England,I.think he can inform you better than I can".

      In my Dad's old MSS" I came across this notice from a London newspaper under date of 28 July 1862,"Peart-Huffam.On the 24th instant at Hessle in the East Riding of Yorkshire,Joseph Hickson Peart Esq,,of Hull to Isabel Symonds second daughter of William Henry Huffam esq.F.S.A.of Hessle.
      From the "China Mail Hongkong 1 Nov.l866 nDeath at Hongkong at midnight 30 Oot.l866 Henry Seymour ,infant son of
      Frederick Sowley Huffam aged 35 days."-F.S.Huffam was deputy registrar of the Supreme Court at Hongkong".You mention Seymour Huffam,Insurance Broker to Lord Rothschild.-I well remember just before leaving England in 1868 my Father taking me up to Lloyd's office at I think the Royal Exchange London,where in a large upper room were quite a lot of very business looking gentleman,a small gate led into this sanctum with a robed of­ficial near it,-On asking my father his business ,Father said he wanted Mr Seymour Huffam-the official then
      paraded away shouting "Seymour Huffam"-presently he came back and said that he was dead. I do not know if there was any family.-I will send you an engraving of my Grandmother Huffam."Theophilus Huffan had an en­graving school at Edmonton,near London.my brother Fred went to his school.Theophilus often visited us at Cowes,and died In the 60s-he was md but had no issue."

      1934,Dec,20,and Jan.l4."A few years ago I knew a "Hurley" in Nelson very well.but do not know where he is now.Since I wrote to you another distant relative has turned up here-Mr Leonard Wm.Huffam,a retired Bank Manager from Scarborough,England.-he has a son in Australia,and is enroute there.-Leonard's picture is in the "Sporting Dramatic News" of N.Z.as a Globe Trotter.-I have a gap in my tree-there is a Solomon born 1736 a ship rigger of Limehouse ,and a note stating that he is supposed to be a cousin of Joseph Huffam the stationer at Rother- " hithe-now my Grandfather was a Stationer there in 1768-I should be much obliged if you can substantiate this. "
      Reference to Scandinavian origen-My father wrote as follows;-The Offhams were of the oldest settled Land owners in Ke Kent ,Sussex.They were lineal descendants of the raiding and pirating Danes who ravaged the South East Coast of England demanding "Danageld and settled there with numerous followers 2 or 3 generations before the Northmen of Normandy invaded and conquered Britain.Some of the Houghams settled on the coast South of Dover,and in the Isle of Thanet.They welcomed and assisted their kinsman William of Normandy,who,after his success awarded them gifts of land.etc.My father doos not say where he got this information-it looks like both versions are right.


      1934.May."I have a bald note on my Dad's that a Wllloughby Mullins married a Louisa Huffam,and they had a son Willoughby Whom my father knew well as. my Father was living at West Cowes,Isle of Wight at the time Cubitt the celebrated Architect was rebuilding and restoring Osborne House for Prince Albert and Queen Victoria, Wllloughby was articled to Cubitt and he was in attendance on Prince Albert to jot down his wishes during the alterations,being a cousin my father got to know him well.-Can you tell me who Louisa Huffam is,I have no dates,she must go back 3,4,or 5 generations."-I have heard my Father say that his father got his amorial bearings from the Herald's office."

      1935 Jan 25. Sarah Huffam married Joseph Jessop,had.6 children.Percy,Ethe1,Walter,Olive,Ferdie,and Hope.I last heard from them in 1896.Joseph Jessop since died suddenly,he had a dry. salters business at St Mary's Chambers, St Mary'As.London,E.C.-address Jessop & Co.-I think his sons still carry it on. Eleanor Huffam married Charles Newman,had two daughters,Eliza and Emma,both.of whom I knew well.Eliza Marriad Percy Boger.and Emma married Stribling,both died without issue.

      1935 April.nMy Father,with his Uncle Joseph Meek went to different Cburoh Registry offices-one especially in Here ford---the Sexton a very old man told then"he held the light while the Duke of Norfolk burnt the registers ", that must have been 150 years ago. In father's notes,he writes under date of 9 Aug.1833-On friday walked to Aconbury Church to search it's books,but found to our disappointment that all the books, registers,and the ins seriptions on ths lids of most of the coffins had all either been burnt or destroyed.by the late Duke of Nor­folk, with his own hands.In like manner he destroyed the registers etc.,of Horn, Littie Dewchuroh,and Kentchuroh."

      1936 Jan.l5.l got My son's family that you asked for;-his name,Blake Frederick Will Huffam .his wife.Martha Colllns, their ohildren,Blake John H.b.4 Oct.l930, Colin H.b.28 Aug.1932, Martha H.b.28 April 1935." • 1937.Feb.17 We had a visit from ny nieoe Mrs Howe(nee May Huffam)for a day."
      1937.Dec.17th."About six months ago we had a bereavement in my sister in law's famlly(Sophia Huffam*s)-her daughter
      May,lost her husband Mr Ernest Howe.age 30.1 will be 89 on Jan.4th,1938."T.Blake Huffam.
      Note;-The foregoing are only small extracts from the long letters sent to me-the full letters are in file-these are
      links between the New Zealand descendants,the Berwick-on-Tweed,and the London Huffams.formerly Houghams of Kent. Timothy Blake Huffam passed away In 1939,and our pleasant correspondence and exchange of family notes ceased.His daughters write occasionally,but not on genealogy.(M.H.Pratt)



      http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=NEM19020726.2.25.5&l=mi&e=-------10--1----2-all

      from the Nelson Evening Mail, 4th Jan 1901 (Nelson is a settlement to the north of Ashburton):
      KITE-FLYING EXTRA-ORDINARY.
      The residents of Nelson have been mistified during the holidays by beholding suspended in the heavens oblong shapes that resembled the air-ships described by George Griffiths in his fanciful war-of-the-future novels. Some regarded the curious visitors as portents, and wanted to know if the Russians, the Boers, or the Chinese had made an up-to-date invasion of the colony. On inquiry, however, it was ascertained that the queer looking objects were merely American Navy Blue Hill box kites, imported by Mr T. Blake Huffam, and flown by him for advertisement and amusement
    Person ID I682  Hougham
    Last Modified 10 Oct 2006 

    Father Huffam, Timothy
              b. 3 Oct 1808, Peckham Surrey Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 11 Jul 1893, Nelson New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years) 
    Mother Blake, Catherine
              b. 15 May 1819, Cowes Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 12 Feb 1862, Cowes Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years) 
    Married 1847  Isle of Wight Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F306  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Jacobsen, Jane
              b. 8 Sep 1863
              d. 5 Sep 1932  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 20 Jun 1885  Nelson new zealand Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Huffam, Julius Valentine Blake
              b. 14 Feb 1888
              d. 22 Jan 1919  (Age 30 years)
     2. Huffam, Dorothy Agnes Jane
              b. 18 Apr 1890
              d. 8 Mar 1912  (Age 21 years)
    +3. Huffam, Runa Francis Brunhilde
              b. 19 Jul 1895
              d. 22 Dec 1988, Nelson New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
    +4. Huffam, Godiva Catherine
              b. 3 Jan 1900
              d. 22 Mar 1985, Wellington New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
    +5. Huffam, Blake Frederick William
              b. 25 Jun 1904, Cambria St Nelson New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 19 Dec 1973, Christchurch New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)
    Family ID F335  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Bark Bay New Zealand
    Bark Bay New Zealand
    Home of Timotheos Blake Huffam
    Timetheos Blake Huffam
    Timetheos Blake Huffam
    Standing Right,
    Not sure who the lady is, the caption says Celia but who is she? I would have thought that she is Jane Jacobson